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This article applies to selling in: Canada

Listing Restrictions

General Listing Restrictions

Category Restrictions
Bilingual Packaging and Labelling See Packaging and Labelling Requirements, as well as the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act and Regulations, and the Food and Drugs Act and Regulations.
Claims Claims made in listings must be accurate and cannot be misleading. A claim can be misleading if relevant information is left out or if the claim implies something that is not true. Additionally, all claims must be substantiated, especially when they concern health, safety, or performance. Upon request, you agree to provide Amazon with documentation substantiating any claim you include in a listing. Substantiation requires competent and reliable scientific evidence and may include tests, analyses, research, studies, or other evidence based on the expertise of third-party professionals in the relevant area. Examples of claims requiring substantiation include claims that a product is "anti-fungal," "anti-microbial," or "anti-bacterial."

Advertising in Canada is regulated by the Competition Bureau of Canada. Self-regulation is administered by Advertising Standards Canada. For more information, see the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards, the Competition Bureau's Guide to the Consumer Packaging and Labelling and Regulations, the False or Misleading Representations and Deceptive Marketing Practices pamphlet, and the Application of the Competition Act to Representations on the Internet Enforcement Guidelines.

Environmental Marketing Environmental claims in listings must be substantiated and comply with all applicable laws and regulations, in addition to relevant standards set by the Canadian Standards Association. Listings should not make non-specific claims which broadly imply that a product is environmentally beneficial. Examples of environmental claims that have been identified by the Competition Bureau of Canada as potentially problematic include "environmentally friendly" and "green."

For more information, see the Competition Bureau's Environmental Claims: A Guide for Industry and Advertisers.

First Nations Products Listings cannot include the terms "First Nations," "Aboriginal," "Native Canadian," or "Indian," or the name of any First Nations Band, if such information in any way inaccurately implies that the product is a "First Nations product" or is made by a band member or a First Nations artisan.

For more information, see the Competition Bureau False or Misleading Representations and Deceptive Marketing Practices pamphlet and the Application of the Competition Act to Representations on the Internet Enforcement Guidelines.

Guarantees Listings must comply with applicable competition, sale of goods, packaging and labelling, and consumer protection legislation. For example, if you use phrases like "satisfaction guaranteed" or "money-back guarantee" in your listings or selling information pages, you must be willing to give full refunds for any reason. Statements made about the performance, efficacy or length of life of a product must be based on adequate and proper testing.

For more information, see the Competition Bureau's statement on Misleading Warranties and Guarantees.

Made in Canada/Product of Canada Any product that you describe, advertise, or label as "Made in Canada" or "Product of Canada" must comply with all relevant Competition Bureau policies.

For more information, see the Competition Bureau's Enforcement Guidelines on "Product of Canada" and "Made in Canada" Claims.

Testimonials, Endorsements, Feedback, and Reviews Testimonials or endorsements must comply with all relevant legislation concerning testimonials, endorsements, feedback, and reviews. For example: (i) you are required to obtain permission from someone before using their words as a testimonial, endorsement, feedback, or review; (ii) testimonials and their depictions must not be otherwise misleading, and you may be required to disclose any "material interests" between you and an endorser; and (iii) additionally, our feedback and product review policies prohibit paying anyone to create a review or offering gifts or refunds for the removal of product reviews of feedback.

For more information, see the Competition Bureau's statement on Untrue, Misleading or Unauthorized Use of Tests and Testimonials.

Product-Specific Listings and Listings Requiring Statements or Disclosures

Category Restrictions
Animals, Furs, and Skins Products made to resemble animal furs and skins, but which are not made from those animals, must include in the title and description that the item is not "genuine". For example, imitation animal clothing must state that the fur is "faux" fur.

When a product is composed of, or includes, hair or fur removed from the skin of an animal, the appropriate generic name must be used (for example, "(name of the animal) hair," or "(name of the animal) fibre"). In addition, products containing down or feathers must use the prescribed generic names.

For more information, see "Textile Descriptions" below, the Competition Bureau's Guide to the Textile Labelling and Advertising Regulations and Guide to the Labelling of Down and Feathers, as well as the Textile Labelling Act and Textile Labelling and Advertising Regulations.

See also Restricted Products: Animals, Animal Products & Plant Products and Restricted Products: Clothing.

Appliance Labelling Listings must comply with the Energy Efficiency Act and Energy Efficiency Regulations, which requires energy efficiency verification marks for televisions and other energy-using devices, as well as EnergyGuide labels for certain appliances (such as refrigerators, washing machines, room air conditioners, etc.), and lighting product labels for certain lighting products.

Listings must also comply with any applicable and additional labelling requirements under provincial energy efficiency laws and regulations.

For more information, see Natural Resource Canada's Guide to the Energy Efficiency Regulations.

Cosmetics Listings must comply with all applicable laws and regulations, including the Cosmetic Regulations. Claims about a cosmetic product must be verifiable and accurately communicate product features, characteristics and performances.

Listings for cosmetic products may not claim that the product has a therapeutic effect. For example, while it may be acceptable for a hair care product to state that it makes hair look thicker, it may not state that it replaces thinning hair. If your product makes therapeutic claims, please see the Non-Prescription Drugs and Natural Health Products section of these Listing Restrictions.

Listings should not claim or imply any product endorsement or authorization by Health Canada or other government agency, or make any direct or indirect reference to the Food and Drug Act, Food and Drug Regulations, or Cosmetic Regulations unless permitted by law.

For more information, see the Health Canada and Advertising Standards Canada Guidelines for Cosmetic Advertising and Labelling Claims.

Electronics Listings must comply with Canadian electrical standards. Electrical products must be approved to Canadian standards and bear an appropriate certification body's mark identifying the product as certified for use in Canada.

For more information, please see provincial electrical safety requirements, such as http://www.esasafe.com/business/product-safety/product-approval and http://www.esasafe.com/electricalproducts/marks in Ontario.

Jewellery Guides Listings for jewellery industry products (including items like watches and spectacle frames) must not be misleading or deceptive, and must be marked and advertised in the manner prescribed by applicable laws and regulations, including the Precious Metals Marking Act and Precious Metals Marking Regulations.

If a listing shows a jewellery industry product with a quality mark, this mark must correctly indicate its quality according to the standards and manner prescribed by law. Listings may not guarantee the durability or wear of the precious metal plating of a product for a period of time.

For more information, see the Precious Metals Marking Act, Precious Metals Marking Regulations, and the Competition Bureau Guide to the Precious Metals Marking Act and Regulations and the Canadian Guidelines with Respect to the Sale and Marketing of Diamonds, Coloured Gemstones and Pearl.

Magnets

Amazon policy requires that all strong magnets (for example, neodymium and rare earth) must be too large to fit inside a cylinder that is 1.25 inches diameter and 2.25 inches long.

For more information, see the Health Canada website for information about small, powerful magnets.

Medical Devices Medical device claims must not exceed the cleared or approved indications for use as specified by Health Canada in its license (or, for exempt devices, as specified in the applicable regulation). Examples of excessive or impermissible claims include: (i) targeting use towards children when the device is intended to be used for adults; (ii) claims that the device will provide clinically significant results without support by valid scientific evidence; and (iii) advertising for use on or in a part of the body not specified in a device's indications for use.

For more information, see the Medical Devices Regulations and Health Canada's Guidance on the Labelling of Medical Devices under Sections 21 to 23 of the Medical Devices Regulations, Appendices for Labelling: Soft Contact Lenses and Menstrual Tampons.

Non-prescription Drugs and Natural Health Products Listings for non-prescription drugs and natural health products cannot be false, misleading, or deceptive in any way.

Only licensed non-prescription drugs and natural health products may be listed. The scope of the advertising must not exceed the terms of the product license, market authorization, or other regulatory provisions that set out the type and extent of advertisement of the product.

Listings should not claim or imply any product endorsement or authorization by Health Canada or other government agency, or make any direct or indirect reference to the Food and Drug Act, Food and Drug Regulations, or Natural Health Products Regulations unless permitted by law. It is acceptable to depict a product label that bears a DIN, DIN-HM, or NPN.

For more information, see the Advertising Standards Canada Non-prescription Drug and Natural Health Product Advertising Reference Library, the Health Canada Consumer Advertising Guidelines for Marketed Health Products (for Non-prescription Drugs including Natural Health Products), and the Policies and Guidelines Documents for Drug and Health Products.

Remember that products requiring a prescription are prohibited.

Upholstered and Stuffed Articles Labelling and Registration Listings for upholstered and stuffed articles (for example, down-filled apparel, bedding items, toys and luggage) must meet the manufacturer registration and labelling requirements prescribed by provincial upholstered and stuffed articles regulations and other applicable rules and policies.

The manufacturers of upholstered and stuffed articles must be registered with the applicable provincial authority and must affix appropriate labels to their products. Labels must indicate the type(s) of filling materials used in the articles by generic name, be securely affixed to the product in a conspicuous location and meet all other prescribed labelling requirements.

For more information, see the Ontario Upholstered and Stuffed Articles Regulations (Ontario Regulation 218/01), the Ontario Upholstered and Stuffed Articles Safety Program Summary, the Manitoba Public Health Act Bedding, Upholstered and Stuffed Articles Regulation, the Quebec Act respecting Stuffing and upholstered and stuffed articles, and Quebec Regulation respecting stuffing and upholstered and stuffed articles.

Wool Product Descriptions Listings for wool products (items made of wool or recycled wool, which includes fibres from sheep, lamb, angora or cashmere goat, camel, alpaca, llama and vicuna) must meet the labelling and advertising requirements prescribed by the Textile Labelling Act and Textile Labelling and Advertising Regulations, or other applicable rules or policies.

The use of non-generic fibre names, unless specifically recognized by the Competition Bureau, is not permitted. For example, you may not refer to your wool product as "pashmina" (which is not a recognized generic fibre name), but should instead use the appropriate generic name for the fibre (e.g., cashmere, wool, etc.). The fibre content should match the product's label.

For more information, see "Textile Descriptions" above, the Competition Bureau's Guide to the Textile Labelling and Advertising Regulations, as well as the Textile Labelling Act and Textile Labelling and Advertising Regulations.

See also Restricted Products: Animals, Animal Products & Plant Products and Restricted Products: Clothing

Resources on Product-Specific Labelling and Advertising Guides

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